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Selmer Mark VI

Discussion in 'Bob's Room' started by georgefurlow, May 27, 2008.

  1. georgefurlow

    georgefurlow New Member Thread Starter

    Dear Bob,

    I noticed that you had your Mark VI Tenor gold plated. Does it devalue the horn to have it plated like that? Another question? Why did you have it plated? Curious.

    :|
     
  2. Rudy

    Rudy Administrator Staff Member

    I'm curious about this also. I remember my sax teacher had a VI, and had it relacquered. On one hand, he didn't want to do it since he didn't want to change the sound of the horn, but he was also interested in preserving its appearance.

    I owned a VII without the scrollwork...it was made around the late 70s when (as rumor had it) the person who did the scrollwork had retired from Selmer and hadn't been replaced yet.
     
  3. Bob Mintzer

    Bob Mintzer Moderator Yellowjacket

    gold plating mark 6

    I did have the MArk 6 I'm playing gold plated about 14 years ago. I dont know if it devalues the horn or not. I did it beause the brass was deteriorating, and the gold plating was the thinnest plating to put on the horn to maintain the integrity of the metal. I like the way the horn responds with the gold on there as well.
     
  4. thiza

    thiza New Member

    hi bob... it gives me great pleasure and makes very emotional to get a chance to write to you... my name is Themba Ndaba from South Africa, a clarinet and saxophone player... really inspired by everything you do including your involvement in the development jazz in summer camps... we have started a big band in Soweto and are facing a challenge in terms of charts... any help in that regard would be highly appreciated....
     
  5. thiza

    thiza New Member

    music development for Africa

    hi bob... it gives me great pleasure and makes very emotional to get a chance to write to you... my name is Themba Ndaba from South Africa, a clarinet and saxophone player... really inspired by everything you do including your involvement in the development jazz in summer camps... we have started a big band in Soweto and are facing a challenge in terms of charts... any help in that regard would be highly appreciated....
     
  6. Bob Mintzer

    Bob Mintzer Moderator Yellowjacket

    See the earlier comments in this forum.
     
  7. segway

    segway Active Member

    Re: music development for Africa

    Deleted
     
  8. Silas paranhos

    Silas paranhos Active Member

    Hello Bob I wonder if you still have your saxophone tenor selmer mark vi and which model you're playing now
     
  9. Silas paranhos

    Silas paranhos Active Member

  10. Silas paranhos

    Silas paranhos Active Member

    Hello Bob I wonder if you still have your saxophone tenor selmer mark vi and which model you're playing now
     
  11. Lehar

    Lehar New Member

    I stood quietly, watching you all speak it, because today just joined the forum, do not know to say something of.
     
  12. Jacks

    Jacks Active Member

    Studies have shown that cancer patients who took turkey tail mushroom extract in conjunction with chemotherapy resulted in a one-third higher five-year survival rate than chemotherapy alone, and they are now an accepted adjunct to cancer treatments based on their immune-fortifying properties. Meanwhile, chaga, which grows primarily on the East Coast as well as in Eastern Europe and Russia, is used as a remedy for all kinds of cancers; shiitake extract is used to treat cancers, as well as HIV/AIDS; oyster mushrooms lower cholesterol and have anti-tumor properties; and reishi have been used as an anti-allergic, anti-tumor and antiviral remedy in China for some 4,000 years, among other uses.
    But how does fungi act as an immunostimulant? All mushrooms contain beta-glucans. “They are basically highly branched, complex, very large sugar molecules,” says Hobbs. “Our gut has receptor sites that we’ve learned to recognize fungi over probably millions of years.” Absorbed by the gut, beta-glucans bind to gut-associated lymphatic tissue (GALT) and macrophages associated with the gut barrier, triggering a group of immune cells, natural killer cells, and phagocytosis—the engulfment of pathogens and foreign substances to break them down. This immune response extends to all edible mushrooms—which are perhaps one of the most overlooked of superfoods—in varying degrees.
    “They’re loaded with iron, copper, phosphorus, potassium, B vitamins, and other trace minerals like zinc,” says Hobbs. “And they are high in fiber, which helps with elimination of toxins, reducing our absorption of fats, and stabilizing blood sugar and blood lipids.”
    The most commonly cultivated mushroom in America is the button mushroom, which grow into crimini and then portobellos.
    “But the problem with those is they’re cultivated in compost, so there’s a lot of fly larvae, so that means they have to spray them with malathion, which is an insecticide,” says Hobbs. “So, unless you buy organic then they could have residue.” And a lot of experts believe buttons are the least nutritious.
    The most nutritious of edibles are shiitakes, oysters—the most digestible of all mushrooms, says Hobbs—maitakes, and of course wild foraged Shiitake Mushrooms. But cooking them is imperative, otherwise our bodies cannot break down and digest their nutrients.
     

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